Arrowhead Orb Weaver

Found in shaded forest, this lesser-encountered Orb Weaver species is one of the few spider species to hang on the web with it’s head pointed upwards. Photographed in Bald Eagle State Forest, PA, USA.
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Carolina Wolf

A Carolina Wolf Spider, interrupted from it's search for food. I had to lay down less than a foot away, for this shot. Photographed near Tucson, AZ, USA.
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Blacklit Scorpion

Due to the chemical composition of their exoskeletons, most (if not all) scorpions glow blue, when viewed with a black light, at nighttime. Arizona Bark Scorpion photographed near Tucson, AZ, USA.
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Yellow Argiope

I love the artfulness of a unique spider web, and Orb Weavers (such as this lovely Yellow Argiope) weave some of the prettiest! Photographed near Exchange, PA, USA.
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Arrow-Shaped Micrathena

A nice, close look at the underside of a tiny Arrow-Shaped Micrathena spider. These lovely orb weavers build rather unique webs, and are somewhat common in Northeastern US woodlands. Photo taken in Bald Eagle State Forest, PA, USA.
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Micrathena Orb Weaver

The tiny, beautiful Arrow-Shaped Micrathena spider. This small orb weaver had a few remaining water droplets from a light shower, soon before I encountered it. Photo taken in Bald Eagle State Forest, PA, USA.
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Jumping Spider

On a super-macro level, I find it fascinating that some spiders become exponentially creepier-looking, while others become, in my humble opinion, downright adorable. This jumping spider (species unknown) definitely fits the latter category. Photo taken in Winfield, PA, USA.
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Spiny Micrathena

This tiny woodland spider is extremely common in the Northeastern US. Often missed, thanks to their small stature, the disproportionately large webs of Spiny Micrathenas are the bane of many a hiker. Photo taken in Winfield, PA, USA.
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Crab Spider

A tiny goldenrod crab spider awaits prey from a stalk of the aforementioned goldenrod plant. Photo taken in Winfield, PA, USA.
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Orange Jumper

Sometimes photo subjects are encountered in the funniest places. While searching for fossils, this little cardinal jumper was unearthed from a layer of rock in which she was hiding. Photo taken near Beaver Springs, PA, USA.
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The animal kingdom’s arachnid class includes such creatures as spiders, scorpions, harvestmen, and ticks, as well as some outrageous oddities (such as vinegaroons and solfugids).  These underappreciated creatures are often written off as pests, and dealt with as such.  If one were to give pause to their persecution, however, one might consider how enriched our world is by these creepy-crawlies (making the exception of ticks, because everyone hates them, myself included).  Have you ever seen the beautifully intricate web of an orb weaver?  What about the outstanding turquoise color of a scorpion, resting under a black light?  Perhaps a spider’s web covered in dewdrops, glimmering in the morning sun?  All of these things offer a testament to the value of arachnids, not to mention the astronomical number of insects they consume, including large numbers of flies, mosquitoes, and gnats.  In this album, you will find some captivating examples of arachnids, especially spiders!